Remodelling Your Kitchen Cabinets

While remodeling your kitchen, install only the essential cabinets, so you can spend on quality rather than quantity. Look for durability, and specify plywood panels rather than particleboard.

Laminate is economical but still can look classy in a patterned finish or trimmed with wood edging.

You should put your money into the hardest-working and most permanent features of the kitchen, especially the cabinets and countertops.

There are two basic cabinet styles: European-style (frameless) and face-framed cabinets. Either can be ordered from custom or semi-custom cabinet-makers or from stock supplies. Each style has a variety of door, wood and finish options.

Some cabinet hardware features simulated finishes or surfaces that look and perform like the real thing. Brass-plated knobs can substitute for solid brass, and some plastic pulls mimic the look of solid surfacing.

Installing cabinets in a remodeled kitchen require some basic finish carpentry skills. Before starting any installation, its a good idea to mark some level and plumbing reference lines on the walls so everything lines up properly. Most stock cabinet layouts wont fit perfectly within a given wall space, but cabinetmakers provide narrow filler pieces to fill in the gaps between cabinets.

The most efficient way to start installation is with the wall cabinets, since the base cabinets would get in your way if they were already in. It is better to put the corner units in first, squaring them and moving toward the center of the wall where you have more leeway for making adjustments.

If your budget is tight and you want to give a new look to your kitchen cabinet, you have the option of re-facing, which involves replacing or veneering the parts of the cabinet that are visible all the time. Therefore, the cabinet boxes — called the cases — stay in their current layout, but get a new finish with veneer. Other parts, such as drawer fronts and cabinet doors, get completely replaced.

Any remodeling idea for a small kitchen must address the following issues: counter space, storage, built-ins, and pantry.

In order to make better use of your kitchen floor space, you need to put up the maximum amount of counters. Plan your design with deeper counters to cover as much of the area not occupied with appliances with counter space if the difference in floor space is a matter of a few square feet.

Squeeze as many cabinets into your design as possible. Deep cabinets that can hold plates should be located near the dishwasher, and large cabinets with slide-out drawers should be placed near the oven.

Another space-saving device is to include built-in facilities. You can have built-in ovens, microwaves and storage for small appliances. This will make your kitchen appear less cluttered. Built-in storage for foods like potatoes and onions and bread storage cabinets will also give the kitchen a cleaner look. You can also opt for waist-high, sliding shelves that hold mixers and toasters. Your small appliances can remain hidden in these shelves and still be easily accessible.

If there is no room for a pantry in your kitchen, consider converting a closet outside the kitchen area to store your cutlery, pots and infrequently used items. You can also include rollout pantries that can be pulled out to view the items you have, but rolled back into a space.

Choose a large sink. It will be easier for you to clean bigger pots and pans. Moreover, a large sink is a great place to stash your dirty pots. A large sink can also serve as a utility sink, too.

You can increase the efficiency of your small kitchen by putting a wire basket on the inside the cabinet or under the sink to hold trash bags and other frequently used items. You can mount an instant hot water heater on the sink to replace the sprayer or soap.

A tile back splash on all the walls above the counters, stove and sink make the kitchen easier to clean.

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